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3 Black Women Share Game-Changing Skin-Care Routines

 

How many times have you asked someone for skin-care advice and cringed the moment they said to drink more water, slather on the coconut oil, or take off your makeup before bed? When you’re nursing issues that go beyond the occasional breakout or blemish, there’s nothing more frustrating than receiving such basic advice.

 

Yes, we know that doing any of those three things can contribute to healthier skin, but let’s be real: that simply isn’t enough for most. Black women in particular face a unique set of obstacles, such as discoloration, which means that when we’re done talking about our favorite hair products, we’re trading skin care secrets, too. And while we admittedly eat up anything a celeb tells us about their regimen, we prefer hearing from women who don’t have 24/7 access to a glam squad.

So, if you’re hoping for a skin transformation of your own this spring, see how three twentysomethings finally beat their biggest skin struggles ahead.

MORE: A Guide to the Most Popular Hairstyles for Black Women

Name: Brettlin
Age: 27
Primary Issue: Dryness

Routine: For the majority of my life, I’ve had clear skin, but after puberty, I felt the need to develop a skin-care regimen to combat dryness. After trying tons of products from Aveeno and St. Ives to Ambi (I had the worst reaction to their products), I stumbled upon Trader Joe’s skin-care section! Now, my daily regimen is very simple, starting with Trader Joe’s Nourish All-in-One Facial Cleanser, followed by a few spritzes of Trader Joe’s Rose Water Facial Toner, and sealing it in with a little bit of Trader Joe’s Vitamin E Oil.

 

I never would have guessed in a million years that their products would do the trick, but I love that my face is not too dry or not too oily as a result of them. Side note: Their Refresh Citrus Body Wash with vitamin C and Coconut Body Butter are bomb.com! My skin is so soft all over and feels so good daily!

MORE: 5 Black-Beauty-Editor-Approved Sunscreens That Won’t Make Your Skin Look Ashy

Name: Danny
Age: 27
Primary Issue: Adult Acne

Routine: I started developing acne when I was 26—26! It was awful. I was embarrassed and confused as to why this would happen to me going into my late 20s. I tried hundreds of dollars’ worth of products before I found ones that actually worked for me (I also went vegan). I’m still dealing with a lot of hyperpigmentation and acne here and there, but it’s getting better. At night, I’m using Urban Skin Rx Clear Skin Cleansing Bar ($24 at Urban Skin Rx).

This stuff is amazing and formulated for women of color. It’s powerful, yet it doesn’t dry out my skin. I also love the eucalyptus smell—very calming after a long day. After that, I tone with Glossier. Solution ($24 at Glossier.). This toner has completely changed the texture of my skin. At first, I was scared at the idea of using an acid on my face nightly, but my skin really took to it. I’m running out of it, and I’m kinda freakin’ out.

 

Next, I moisturize. I use Radha Beauty Rosehip Oil ($15.95 on Radha Beauty). I found this on Amazon, and I’m so glad I did because it blends beautifully into my skin, leaving it hydrated and luminous. I have oily skin, so I was hesitant about using oil on my face, but this has helped balance out my skin’s oil production. I then spot-treat if I’m dealing with any breakouts. I use tea tree oil, usually from Trader Joe’s and De La Cruz Sulfur Ointment ($6.99 at Walgreens).
google.com, pub-2377999645163045, DIRECT, f08c47fec0942fa0

They both work great at drying out those nasty pimples. About three times a week I use a mask. It’s typically the same mask because I love it and it’s natural, which I’m all about, and it works at keeping my skin plump, clear, and smooth—Girl Undiscovered’s Stumbled Across Paradise Mask ($45 at Girl Undiscovered, but totally worth it). I found this when my sister left it at my mom’s house over Christmas.

If I’m not wearing makeup that day, I don’t cleanse in the morning. I just don’t find it as necessary as I did when my face was extremely oily. If I am wearing makeup that day, I cleanse in the morning with my Urban Skin Rx Bar and then tone with Thayers’ Rose Petal Witch Hazel ($10.95 at Thayers)—yes, the one everyone uses and loves. I then moisturize with my rosehip oil (it sits nicely under makeup) and the final and most important step—sunscreen! I’m currently using Jack Black’s Oil-Free Sun Guard with SPF 45 ($21 at Jack Black). Sunscreen is so important for those of us dealing with hyperpigmentation; don’t want those dark spots to get darker!

3 Black Women Share Game-Changing Skin-Care Routines

Photo: Getty Images/Allison Kahler

 

How many times have you asked someone for skin-care advice and cringed the moment they said to drink more water, slather on the coconut oil, or take off your makeup before bed? When you’re nursing issues that go beyond the occasional breakout or blemish, there’s nothing more frustrating than receiving such basic advice.

 

Yes, we know that doing any of those three things can contribute to healthier skin, but let’s be real: that simply isn’t enough for most. Black women in particular face a unique set of obstacles, such as discoloration, which means that when we’re done talking about our favorite hair products, we’re trading skin care secrets, too. And while we admittedly eat up anything a celeb tells us about their regimen, we prefer hearing from women who don’t have 24/7 access to a glam squad.

So, if you’re hoping for a skin transformation of your own this spring, see how three twentysomethings finally beat their biggest skin struggles ahead.

MORE: A Guide to the Most Popular Hairstyles for Black Women

Name: Brettlin
Age: 27
Primary Issue: Dryness

Routine: For the majority of my life, I’ve had clear skin, but after puberty, I felt the need to develop a skin-care regimen to combat dryness. After trying tons of products from Aveeno and St. Ives to Ambi (I had the worst reaction to their products), I stumbled upon Trader Joe’s skin-care section! Now, my daily regimen is very simple, starting with Trader Joe’s Nourish All-in-One Facial Cleanser, followed by a few spritzes of Trader Joe’s Rose Water Facial Toner, and sealing it in with a little bit of Trader Joe’s Vitamin E Oil.

 

I never would have guessed in a million years that their products would do the trick, but I love that my face is not too dry or not too oily as a result of them. Side note: Their Refresh Citrus Body Wash with vitamin C and Coconut Body Butter are bomb.com! My skin is so soft all over and feels so good daily!

MORE: 5 Black-Beauty-Editor-Approved Sunscreens That Won’t Make Your Skin Look Ashy

Name: Danny
Age: 27
Primary Issue: Adult Acne

Routine: I started developing acne when I was 26—26! It was awful. I was embarrassed and confused as to why this would happen to me going into my late 20s. I tried hundreds of dollars’ worth of products before I found ones that actually worked for me (I also went vegan). I’m still dealing with a lot of hyperpigmentation and acne here and there, but it’s getting better. At night, I’m using Urban Skin Rx Clear Skin Cleansing Bar ($24 at Urban Skin Rx).

This stuff is amazing and formulated for women of color. It’s powerful, yet it doesn’t dry out my skin. I also love the eucalyptus smell—very calming after a long day. After that, I tone with Glossier. Solution ($24 at Glossier.). This toner has completely changed the texture of my skin. At first, I was scared at the idea of using an acid on my face nightly, but my skin really took to it. I’m running out of it, and I’m kinda freakin’ out.

 

Next, I moisturize. I use Radha Beauty Rosehip Oil ($15.95 on Radha Beauty). I found this on Amazon, and I’m so glad I did because it blends beautifully into my skin, leaving it hydrated and luminous. I have oily skin, so I was hesitant about using oil on my face, but this has helped balance out my skin’s oil production. I then spot-treat if I’m dealing with any breakouts. I use tea tree oil, usually from Trader Joe’s and De La Cruz Sulfur Ointment ($6.99 at Walgreens).

They both work great at drying out those nasty pimples. About three times a week I use a mask. It’s typically the same mask because I love it and it’s natural, which I’m all about, and it works at keeping my skin plump, clear, and smooth—Girl Undiscovered’s Stumbled Across Paradise Mask ($45 at Girl Undiscovered, but totally worth it). I found this when my sister left it at my mom’s house over Christmas.

If I’m not wearing makeup that day, I don’t cleanse in the morning. I just don’t find it as necessary as I did when my face was extremely oily. If I am wearing makeup that day, I cleanse in the morning with my Urban Skin Rx Bar and then tone with Thayers’ Rose Petal Witch Hazel ($10.95 at Thayers)—yes, the one everyone uses and loves. I then moisturize with my rosehip oil (it sits nicely under makeup) and the final and most important step—sunscreen! I’m currently using Jack Black’s Oil-Free Sun Guard with SPF 45 ($21 at Jack Black). Sunscreen is so important for those of us dealing with hyperpigmentation; don’t want those dark spots to get darker!

MORE: Game-Changing Skin-Care Tips Every Black Woman Should Know

Name: Dee Dee
Age: 29
Primary Issue: Oily Skin

 

Routine: I exfoliate twice a week with a mixture of Arm & Hammer Baking Soda ($0.79 at Target) and Alaffia Everyday Shea Lavender Body Lotion ($14.99 at Alaffia). Then I wash my face with Alaffia Body Wash: Shea Butter & Neem Lavender ($14.99 at Alaffia) and use a dark-colored face cloth to lightly scrub off the soap. I have several rags, so I wash and replace my face rag two to three times a week. I replace all of my rags with new ones once or twice a year.

I put the coconut oil around my eyes. I put Alaffia Everyday Shea Lavender Body Lotion to moisturize and Coppertone Sunscreen Lotion ($6.06 at Amazon) on top of that if I know I’m going to be in the sun for an extended period of time. At night, I put Garden of Life Raw Extra Virgin Coconut Oil ($14.39 at Garden of Life) all over my face and wipe it off with a damp face rag. After that, I put Dickinson’s Original Witch Hazel Pore Perfecting Toner ($4.69 at Target) on either cotton balls or cotton pads and rub it all over my face and neck as an astringent. Lastly, I put on Alaffia Everyday Shea Lavender Body Lotion to moisturize.

http://stylecaster.com/beauty/skin-care-routines-of-black-women

African-American hair:

Unique in appearance and structure, African-American hair is especially fragile and prone to injury and damage. More than half of African-American women will cite thinning hair or hair loss as their top hair concern. Fortunately, there is a lot African-Americans can do to help minimize damage and keep their hair beautiful.

To help African-Americans keep their hair healthy, dermatologists recommend the following tips:

  1. Wash hair once a week or every other week: This will help prevent build-up of hair care products, which can be drying to the hair.
  2. Use conditioner: Use conditioner every time you wash your hair. Be sure to coat the ends of the hair with conditioner, as the ends are the oldest and most fragile part of your hair.
  3. Use a hot oil treatment twice a month: This adds additional moisture and elasticity to your hair.
  4. Use a heat protecting product before styling: Adding this to wet hair before styling will help minimize heat damage.
  5. Use caution with relaxers: To minimize hair damage, always go to a professional hair stylist to ensure that the relaxer is applied safely. Touch-ups should only be done every two to three months and only to newly grown hair. Never apply relaxer to hair that has already been relaxed.
  6. Use ceramic combs or irons to press hair: If you would like to press or thermally straighten your hair, use a ceramic comb or iron and only do so once a week. Use a straightening device with a dial to ensure the device is not too hot. Use the lowest possible temperature setting that gives you the style you want. A higher temperature may be necessary for thicker, coarser hair.
  7. Make sure braids, cornrows or weaves are not too tight: If it hurts while your hair is being styled, ask the stylist to stop and redo it. Pain equals damage.

See a board-certified dermatologist if you notice any changes in the texture or appearance of your hair. Even the slightest bit of noticeable thinning can be the start of hair loss. The earlier hair loss is diagnosed, the more effectively it can be treated.

https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/hair-care/african-american-hair

 

Sista’s Makeup Tips

When browsing the makeup counters at department stores, some women of color may find that not all cosmetics lines cater to their beauty needs. In other words, it can be difficult to find makeup for African American skin. Some makeup lines simply do not have foundations that go dark enough, causing one to look washed out, while others may lack the colors that will show up on darker skin. Los Angeles Makeup artist Phil Ranger shares some African American makeup tips to help you achieve the ultimate look.

1) Face: Avoid makeup that is too light, as it can make skin look chalky. Yellow-based foundations work best for women with darker skin. The goal is to see the makeup disappear after applying it on your skin, with no visible boundary between. Test foundation colors in natural light — if you have trouble finding the right color, try mixing two shades (one darker than your natural color and one lighter). When searching for blush or bronzer, brown and copper complement African American skin tones. A touch of shimmer will highlight cheekbones nicely.

2) Lips: Earth tones, neutrals, pinks and dark burgundy instantly add glam to lips. For a more natural look, dab on some lip-gloss. Choose a lip liner that is close to the shade of your lip-gloss or lipstick to avoid a dark outline.

3) Eyes: Shimmery and metallic eye shadows can look amazing against African American skin. Mixing two complimentary colors like gold and purple can boost the drama factor. The darker your skin, the brighter the colors you can pull off. Accentuate eyes with brown or black eyeliner. Black mascara will make eyelashes stand out. For extra pizzazz, try false eyelashes.

For those looking for the best makeup for African American women, there are several noteworthy lines. Supermodel Iman founded IMAN Cosmetics in 1994, a collection that features makeup for women of all shades. Cover Girl carries the Queen collection line, which actress Queen Latifah posing as the new face for the cosmetics. Cover Girl has some of the best makeup for African American women, and includes everything from concealer to nail polish. M.A.C. is another popular brand that carries a variety of shades and bright shadows and lip colors to give darker skin that extra pop. Black Radiance is dedicated completely to women of color, and Fashion Fair is the oldest and most established makeup brand for black women. Combine these African American makeup tips along with the best makeup for African American women for the ultimate beauty experience.

http://www.totalbeauty.com/content/article/african-american-makeup-tips

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